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  1. Lions come from Africa, as do diamonds, as well as good music, listen to some African music from way back and the melodies are familiar to modern music here in the west, everything has been heard before, everything is a replica of yesteryear, i don't have have a problem with this, it is all good.

  2. MBUBE
    (Solomon Linda 1939)

    Njalo Ekuseni Uya Waletha Amathamsanqa
    Yebo!
    Amathamsanqa

    Mbube
    Uyimbube
    Uyimbube
    Uyimbube
    (repeat 2 times)

    Uyimbube
    Uyimbube Mama We

    He! He! He! He!
    Uyimbube Mama

    We We We We We We
    Uyimbube
    Uyimbube

    Kusukela Kudala Kuloku Kuthiwa
    Uyimbube
    Uyimbube Mama

    Every Morning You Bring Us Good Luck
    Yes!
    Good Luck

    Lion
    You're A Lion
    You're A Lion
    You're A Lion

    You're A Lion
    You're A Lion, Mama!

    Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey!
    You're A Lion, Mama

    Oh Oh Oh Oh Oh Oh
    You're A Lion
    You're A Lion

    Long, Long Ago People Used To Say
    You're A Lion
    You're A Lion, Mama

  3. All of the comments about an African man having his song stolen from him are way off base. If the American version had never been recorded we would never have known of Solomon Linda today.

    And yes:

    In February 2006, Linda's heirs attained a legal settlement with Abilene Music company, which had the worldwide rights and had licensed the song to Disney. This settlement applies to worldwide rights, not just South African, since 1987. The money will go to a trust, to be administered by SA Music Rights CEO Nick Motsatsi.[12][13]

    I happen to love Solomon Linda's original version more than "The Lion Sleeps Tonight." Without this introduction to Isicathamiya we may never have been able to enjoy "Ladysmith Black Mambazo." All of the details are on Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_Linda

  4. József Attila: Ne légy szeles…

    Ne légy szeles.
    Bár a munkádon más keres –
    dolgozni csak pontosan, szépen,
    ahogy a csillag megy az égen,
    úgy érdemes.

    (1936)